Three Reasons you are Too Busy With Work and Life to Exercise.

We have all been there, too busy, tired or have more important things to do than to exercise.

I’m going to be giving you some tough love, because I’ve had to recently do this for myself.

There is ALWAYS time to exercise in life. One of three things is usually the culprit of why exercise does not happen in our lives.

  • Priorities. Everything we do in life is about priorities, and priorities dictate the way our life moves. If you do not prioritize exercise and training, you will not do it because there are so many other things and distractions that will get in our way instead. So, work today on how you are going to prioritize exercise and movement.
  • Time Management. Telling yourself that you do not have time to exercise is 99% of the time not true. You do have time, but your time management is poor. Have you ever looked at your screen time and how much of your day you are on your phone? I bet you may be spending most of your day on your phone looking at instagram, TikTock or some other mindless distraction when you could be spending that time moving and exercising. Instead, put your phone down and stretch, strengthen, work on your mobility or flexibility for 20-30 min. Want to watch your favourite show? Okay no problem, but while you are watching it, roll out a mat and exercise WHILE you watch it. Another idea, if you can, get to bed earlier and wake up earlier before your busy day gets started and exercise. Time management is everything, it gives us the freedom to do the things we love.
  • Excuses. We have all used excuses in the past and some even in the present, you may be using one right this second. As mentioned above, excuses can be valid and true at times, but they really are not serving you. You have this thing that is very valid, but it serves no purpose in your life. So what you need to do is get rid of your excuses, get them out of your life. Because once you start doing this you will all of a sudden find more time to do more things. Excuses are just justifications to make ourselves feel better.

Think of this equation the next time you want to skip out on exercise:

make exercise a priority + work on your time management skills = less excuses

If you work on making exercise a priority (in any shape or form of activity), and you work on improving your time management skills and MAKE the time for it in the week, then you will not have any excuses left to get it done. Start with 2 times a week for 5-10 min, believe me when I say, your body will thank you. And you may find out that you really like exercise. In fact, it may turn into love one day.

Now, this is not to say that if you have been working hard and training all week that taking a day off to rest is bad. IT IS NECESSARY. In fact, you should have at least 2 rest days a week if you are training or being active 3-5 days out of the week. I’m saying this for the people like myself that has not been consistently active. 5-10 min is all you need to stretch, strengthen or mobilize. Set a timer and get the thing done.

LEW xoxo


Glute Bridge and Dead Bug Exercise – Progressions

Here are two ways to progress both the dead bug and glute bridge exercises


1) Dead bug: place one end of a band around the arch of your foot and the second end in the fist of your hand. Then pull the two ends apart against the resistance.
IMPORTANT: be sure to engage your core throughout the entire exercise and be sure to not loose it.


2) Glute Bridge: place one band around your thighs just above your knees. Then a second band under your feet and around the top of your hips. Spread your legs a bit to engage your glutes more then lift up through your hips against the second resistance.
IMPORTANT: Be sure to engage your glutes and core before you lift. Also be sure you are only lifting as high as you comfortably can without straining your neck.


Tag me on Instagram if you give these a try!


What is Athletic Therapy?

As many of you may know already, I am a Certified Athletic Therapist and Registered Massage Therapist. With the month of June being Athletic Therapy awareness month (I realize it’s July by the time I uploaded this, but the world is a bit different right now), I thought I would make a video explaining what athletic therapy is, the difference between athletic therapy and physiotherapy and how to become an athletic therapist. Enjoy!


How to become an Athletic Therapist

I have been asked this a lot in recent years, which is so great to see because our college is still quite small, it’s starting to become larger but more the merrier!

Schooling

First things first, you need to go to school to become an athletic therapist. Here in Canada, you will need to complete a 4 year Bachelor’s of Applied Health Sciences Degree (BAHSc(AT)) at one of the following colleges and universities:

This program is accredited for the following entry methods only: Athletic Therapy Certificate embedded as a major within a four-year York University Kinesiology degree

  • University of Manitoba
    Ms. Jacqueline Elliott
    102 Frank Kennedy Centre Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2
    Tel. (204) 474-9143 Fax (204) 474-7634
    Email:  Jacqueline.elliott@umanitoba.ca
    Website: umanitoba.ca
  • University of Winnipeg
    Mr. Ben Trunzo
    515 Portage Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 2E9
    Tel. (204) 786-9249 Fax (204) 783-7866
    Email: b.trunzo@uwinnipeg.ca
    Website: uwinnipeg.ca 
  • Mount Royal University
    Dr. Mark Lafave
    4825 Richard Rd. S.W. Calgary, Alberta T3E 6K6
    Tel. (403) 440-6500
    Email: physedinfo@mtroyal.ca
    Website: www.mtroyal.ca
  • Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
    Dr. Philippe Fait
    Directeur de programme, concentration thérapie du sport
    Département des sciences de l’activité physique
    Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
    3351 Boulevard des Forges, Trois-Rivières, QC G9A 5H7
    Téléphone : 819 376-5011 Sans frais : 1 800 365-0922
    Email : philippe.fait@uqtr.ca
    Website : https://www.uqtr.ca/

I personally went to Sheridan College in Brampton Ontario and can speak of my personal experiences at this college. It was a fantastic program, and I had the pleasure of having both Kirsty McKenzie and Dr. Loriann Hynes as professors, they are both absolutely lovely if you will be contacting them from the list above. The facility at Sheridan college is one of the best in my opinion, there is a gym and clinic full of some of the best equipment, including an underwater treadmill (mind blown, I know). There is also multiple dedicated spaces for classrooms and labs in the program.

How do I get into the program?

Now keep in mind, I started at Sheridan College in 2008, so things may have changed since then considering that was 12 years ago (holy crumbs). But I have looked up the recent requirements on Sheridan’s website, they go as follows:

Admission RequirementsApplicant SelectionEnglish Language Proficiency
Program Eligibility
Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent, including the following required courses:
• English, Grade 12 (ENG4U)
plus
• Biology, Grade 12 (U)
plus one of:
• Physics, Grade 12 (U) or
• Mathematics, Grade 12 (U) or
• Chemistry, Grade 12 (U)
plus
• Three additional Grade 12 credits at the U or M level
• Minimum 65% in each course
Or
Two semesters of postsecondary education including required courses with a minimum 65% in each course.
Eligible applicants will be selected on the basis of their previous academic achievement (the average of their six highest senior-level credits, including required courses).
Co-op experience related to Athletic Therapy is strongly recommended.
Applicants must attend an information session.
All applicants whose first language is not English must meet Sheridan’s English Proficiency Requirements.
Refer to the website for full admission requirements.

What do I learn in the program?

Once you are in the program you will have a wide range of classes over the 4 years all progressively becoming a bit more difficult but perfectly piecing it all together.

Your first year is your basic sciences including, biology, psychology, physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, protective equipment and bracing, and exercise physiology. Then for the remainder of years 3-4 you ill be taking multiple levels of all the following classes: anatomy, pathophysiology, emergency care, conditions, therapeutics exercise, modalities, biomechanics, psychology, assessment and rehab, manual techniques along with clinical and field placements. All classes will be in the form of classroom lectures and labs.

Here is an attachment of what to expect: https://academics.sheridancollege.ca/-/media/files/programspdf/bachelor-of-applied-health-sciences-athletic-therapy_en.ashx

I have graduated school, now what?

You have made it through the jam packed 4 years of awesome education, congratulations! Now you have to prepare for the national exams. The exams will test your knowledge in CATA’s scope of practice and competencies in athletic therapy. This process ensures that successful certification candidates have demonstrated basic competence in athletic therapy and ensures the safety and care of the public when providing athletic therapy services to Canadians.

Now, when I was completing my national exams, we were required to do a 200 multiple choice question written exam and the next day we would complete practical exams in both field and clinical. If my memory serves me correct, the field practical exams had 2 taping, one emergency, one non-emergency and I think an on field assessment. The clinical exams included an assessment and an acute treatment and chronic treatment (return to play) of the condition you assessed.

However! Times have change and now the exam is just a 200 multiple choice question written exam. I personally think the association should have kept the practicals in there, but that is just my input.

Then once you pass everything, you are now a Certified Athletic Therapist, CAT(C). Yay!

What is the difference between Canadian and American Athletic Therapy?

Here in Canada we are referred as certified athletic therapists (CAT(C)) under the Canadian Athletic Therapist Association (CATA) and in the states they are known as athletic trainer certified (ATC) under the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA).

For more information on how to become an Athletic Therapist in Canada: https://athletictherapy.org/en

For more information on how to become an Athletic Trainer in America: https://www.nata.org

If you have any more questions on how to become an athletic therapist please visit the links above or you can find me on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lewslife_/ or in my contact box on my website: https://lewslife.com/contact/

What is the difference between Athletic Therapy and Physiotherapy? Click here to read more.


T’s and Y’s

LOVE this exercise!

This targets the mid traps, lower traps and rhomboids. Great for shoulder stabilization and strength. It is also fantastic for re-education of the muscle firing patterns within the body and decrease the upper traps from doing everything and causing neck and shoulder pain.

Thumbs up and in a T position = Mid Trap

Thumbs down and in a T position = Rhomboids

Thumbs up and in a Y position = Lower Traps

Proper Form:

Laying on the ground roll up a towel and place it under your forehead so you can breathe without having to turn your head to one side, this will help prevent a strain in your neck. Arms at shoulder height and thumbs up – lift your arms up and squeeze your shoulder blades together (you should feel this in your mid back). Then in the same ’T’ position, put your thumbs down and lift your arms up off the ground (you should feel this in your mid back). The last position is in a ‘Y’ position, put your thumbs up and lift your arms off the ground (you should feel this in your mid to lower back).

Music from: https://www.bensound.com

Once you become really good at this exercise you can then add tension from a resistance band and do this exercise standing up (such as what you can see in the attached video below).

IMPORTANT: Be sure you are contracting your shoulders back and down with a chin tuck before each repetition, it is important to be firing the right muscles with this exercise. Squeeze your shoulder blades together as you go into the resistance, this may help to decrease over firing of the upper traps. You should not feel this exercise in your upper neck or into your head, if you do, reset your shoulder blades and chin tuck and try again.

Please Keep This Disclaimer in Mind:

Articles are for educational purposes only and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent diseases. We cannot and do not provide medical advice or specific advice on products related to treatments of a disease or illness.

You must not rely on the information on our website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare providers.

You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice or discontinue medical treatment because of information on our website.

It is your responsibility to consult with your professional health care providers before starting any diet changes, exercise or supplementation program, and before taking; varying the dosage and / or ceasing to take any medication.

We do not collect any personal information or store cookies.  You can turn off cookies on your web browsers.


Foods that will worsen or improve menstrual cramps

It is 5 am, and you have just been woken up by a visit from mother nature and you feel as though there are 1000 kittens clawing at your insides. We have all been there one too many times, but did you know you could make this feel better or worse through diet?

From my research online, I am here to give you the coles notes version of which foods will make your time of the month, a walk in the park or like a snowball’s chance in hell.

Foods that will make matters worse:

Sugar: Yes, we all have the sugar crave around this time of the month. Fun fact, this is because our stress hormone, cortisol spikes just before our periods come and serotonin, our mood balancing hormone, tends to dip. This deadly combination results in cravings for sweets, carbs and fatty foods. However, eating this type of food will actually disrupt our natural blood sugar levels. With a spike in blood sugar levels, you will get higher mood swings and more tension within the body.

Refined Food and Processed Foods: First of all, refined foods have been highly processed so that the natural grain is no longer intact and stripped of all nutritional value. They include but are not limited to: white bread, white pasta, white rice, white sugar, breakfast cereals, and bagels. They are all simple carbohydrates and are hidden with a load of sugar, this is why our bodies crave it over and over again. It gives the body a quick huge spike in sugar and this is followed by an even larger crash. Same thing goes for processed foods such as cakes, cookies, crackers and chips. Due to how they are made and what they are made with, it will cause havoc within your body and therefore increase inflammation.

Fried foods: According to a study by the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, fried foods such as pizza, fries, and donuts will all cause inflammation in the body, and this can be linked to an increase in period pain. I get it, we all need carbs at this time of the month, so maybe go for a piece of whole grain toast or 23g of carbs from a banana instead.

Saturated Fats: These consist of fatty cuts of meat, dark meat, high fat dairy foods, tropical oils such as: coconut oil, palm oil, and cocoa butter. Not only is high amounts of this food bad for your health, but they will cause inflammation within the body. As we already discussed above, an increase in inflammation will increase menstrual pain.

Dairy: I’m not bashing dairy, this is a great source of calcium, however, if you go over board on that block of cheese and all of a sudden there is only one slice left…you may be in trouble. According to Healthline, dairy can cause your menstrual pain to worsen due to the bloating, gas and diarrhea that it can cause within the body.

Fizzy drinks: This is due to the bloating and gas they can cause within the body, therefore, inflammation. This includes: pop, carbonated water, beer, and alcoholic drinks. This actually leads me to my next item on the list.

Alcohol: According to the New York Times, alcohol can make PMS symptoms worse and prolong the menstrual cramping. So it may be a good idea to put down that glass of red wine this week.

Tea and coffee: Due to the caffeine found in both of these lovely energy packed drinks, this can increase estrogen levels and therefore PMS symptoms.

Red Meat: Yes, we as women are often told to eat more of this to decrease anemia or iron deficiency. However, this is often loaded with saturated fat, and this can cause inflammation within the body, which in turn, can lead to cramps. Maybe opt the red meat out for a omega rich food such as salmon, as this has healthy nutrients your body needs. If you do not eat meat, dark  leafy greens it is!

Salt: Too much of something, is never a good thing, especially when this comes to salt. Too much salt will cause bloating and this will increase menstrual pain.

Legumes: Did you know beans can cause you to bloat, yup, this is the cause of the adverse reaction that will clear a room. So while on your period avoid beans such as black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils and peas.

What do all of these foods have in common? Inflammation – they are all infamous for causing inflammation in the body.  You are probably thinking…so what do you eat instead to decrease this lovely natural movement in the body?

Foods to eat to improve PMS and menstrual cramps:

Bananas: This magical fruit is amazing during that time of the month. Being rich in fibre will help to cause a bowel movement, which in turn will help decrease bloating and less pain. As an added bonus, they contain magnesium, this will help to relax the muscles from cramping. Just keep in mind that they do contain a lot of sugar so try to not go over board.

Lemons: They contain vitamin C and at this time of the month you want to get a lot of this in your diet. This being because vitamin C helps the body absorb iron better, and if you are absorbing iron better, you will have more energy. They also contain fibre and this will help with muscle spasms.

Oranges: This is the top food for anyone with period pain. Not only does it contain more vitamin C then lemons, it also contains magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D. All nutrients that will help your body through anything it may be battling.

Watermelon: This is a great fruit to consume during your time of the month because of how hydrating it is. Hydration is important to decrease muscle spasms along with the magnesium you can get from the other foods mentioned above. 

Broccoli: This is another great contender to battling menstrual cramps due to the iron and fibre it contains.

Kale: Another great food for the reasons similar to broccoli and other greens, this great leaf is amazing for boosting your immune system.

Drinks: Water, Chamomile, ginger tea, peppermint tea, raspberry leaf tea – all great for hydrating, decreasing bloating, soothing your bowels, and have anti-inflammatory properties.

So sticking to whole foods like fruit, vegetables, lean meats, and digestible grains can help to decrease the inflammation caused in the body. Whole foods contain nutrients that will help your nerves, hormones and muscles relax at this time of the month. This in turn, will help with all around health within your beautiful body.

References:

https://www.insider.com/foods-to-avoid-when-you-have-period-cramps-2018-5

https://flo.health/menstrual-cycle/health/cramps/foods-for-cramps-relief

https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/08/07/how-to-deal-with-period-cravings_a_23069359/

Please Keep This Disclaimer in Mind:

Articles are for educational purposes only and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent diseases. We cannot and do not provide medical advice or specific advice on products related to treatments of a disease or illness.

You must not rely on the information on our website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare providers.

You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice or discontinue medical treatment because of information on our website.

It is your responsibility to consult with your professional health care providers before starting any diet changes, exercise or supplementation program, and before taking; varying the dosage and / or ceasing to take any medication.

We do not collect any personal information or store cookies.  You can turn off cookies on your web browsers.


Squat, because no one raps about little butts

This month’s exercise is a squat. This is a fantastic all around full body exercise that is very functional for everyday life. Have I convinced you yet to give it a try?

Targets: quadriceps. Also incorporates: gluteus maximus, aductor magnus, soleus, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, erector spinae, rectus abdominis, obliques.

How To: Squat down by bending your hips back, as if you are sitting in a chair, while allowing knees to bend forward being sure to not extend them too far past the toes, keeping your back straight and knees pointed same direction as feet (towards the 2nd and 3rd toes). Descend until thighs are just past parallel to floor. Extend knees and hips until legs are straight. Return and repeat. 

Important to keep in mind: Keep your head facing forward, back straight and feet flat on floor; equal distribution of weight throughout forefoot and heel. Knees should point same direction as feet throughout movement. Core engaged, shoulders back and down with chin tucked and squeeze your glutes on the way back up. Once you add a bar, DO NOT place the bar on the back of your neck, be sure it is placed on the top of your shoulders (feel for the ‘shelf’).

What do I do with my hands? Well, this depends on how you are doing the squat.

If you are doing a body weight squat, you can put them out in front of you or cross your arms over your chest. If you are doing the exercise with a dowel or the squat bar, place the dowel behind you placed on your shoulders, NOT your neck, and have your hands equally on both sides holding the bar in place.

Once you start to become a natural at this exercise then you can start switching it up by changing how and where you hold the squat bar (i.e. front squat vs. back squat), you can bring in different gym equipment like a barbell or kettlebell, or change the positioning of your feet and legs. There is just so much you can do, isn’t it so exciting?!

This is a great all around exercise to become comfortable and familiar with. Give it a try today with your body weight alone, then add in a dowel, and finally progress to a squat bar as your biomechanics improve.


You’re everthing I ‘avo’ wanted

Avocados

Some quick fun facts about this amazing fruit:

  • Avocados are a heart-healthy, nutrient-dense superfood and are loaded with monounsaturated fatty acids
  • They contain good fats and are naturally sodium, sugar and cholesterol-free
  • Avocados have dietary fibre. Fun fact, fibre is very important for overall gut health
  • They contain more potassium then bananas
  • The healthy fat content found in them may help you absorb nutrients from plant foods
  • They are loaded with antioxidants that can protect your eyes
  • An avocado MAY help with preventing cancer
  • Avocado extract MAY help to relieve symptoms of arthritis
  • Eating this amazing fruit MAY help to shed some weight

In a 100g serving of avocado, there is 160 calories, 2 grams of protein and 15 grams of healthy fats. It contains 9 grams of carbs, and 7 of those are fibre.

All in all, this is an amazing source of nutrients and it is delicious to boot! So give one a try before it is too late…get it? Maybe this photo will help you:

Please Keep This Disclaimer in Mind:

This article is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent diseases. We cannot provide medical advice or specific advice on products related to treatments of a disease or illness. You must consult with your professional health care provider before starting any diet changes, exercise or supplementation program, and before taking, varying the dosage of or ceasing to take any medication.


Athletic Therapy vs. Physiotherapy: Is there a difference?

In the world of healthcare professionals, it can get confusing as to what each one specializes in and what kind of treatment you may receive from them. The two most common distinct healthcare professions that are confused with each other are Athletic Therapy and Physiotherapy. Both are trained in musculoskeletal rehabilitation and assessment, and have a few differences.

Athletic therapists are focused solely on musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and can be found working in a clinic setting or with a team. Meanwhile, physiotherapists have a wider scope of practice which encompasses neurological and cardiovascular health issues as well as musculoskeletal, and can be found working both the hospital setting and in outpatient clinics. Both professions will complete a thorough assessment of your injury, and provide education, complete manual therapy techniques and provide therapeutic exercises for you to complete at home. They will help manage both acute and chronic injuries, all the while maintaining a high professional standard of care for all of their patients.

You do not need a referral from a doctor to see either an AT or physio, however you should always check with your extended healthcare provider to see if you are covered, as different providers cover different therapies.

Shared skills and knowledge of each profession:Shared treatment approaches of each profession:
1) Assessment and diagnosis of injuries
2) Treat sport injuries, work injuries, MVA’s, and life injuries
3) Rehabilitation and exercise programs are included with the treatment plan of all injuries
4) Educate patients in management of acute and chronic injuries
1) Soft tissue manipulation and joint mobilizations
2) Preventative taping and
Electrotherapy training (NMES, TENS, IFC, ultrasound, heat and ice, etc)
3) Exercise prescription (strength, flexibility, mobility, and proprioception)
4) Biomechanics analysis
5) Patient Education

Athletic Therapy

Athletic Therapists are experts in musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. This is accomplished after a highly demanding 4 year program, at an applicable university, to achieve a degree of Bachelor of Applied Health Sciences. This program focuses primarily on rehabilitation, assessment, prevention and restoring of the musculoskeletal system through maintaining and maximizing the bodies movement to relieve pain and increase your quality of life. Following this program there is an intense national certification exam of a written and practical that must be passed in order to work in Canada as a Certified Athletic Therapist. They are typically found working in a clinical setting or with a sports team in a field setting providing emergency care.

It is very common to have the name give a false representation of who they can treat. They do specialize in athletes as the name provides, but they are also trained in MVA’s (motor vehicle accidents), work injuries (the industrial athlete), post-operation, and everyday aches and pains.

The regulating body of the profession is the Canadian Athletic Therapists Association (CATA) and each province across Canada has a provincial chapter as well.

The definition of the profession provided by the national association is as follows:

“Certified Athletic Therapists are best known for their quick-thinking on-field emergency care of professional and elite athletes. The first to respond when someone gets hurt, they are experts at injury assessment and rehabilitation. It’s that same mix of on-site care and active rehabilitation skills that makes Athletic Therapists so effective in treating the musculoskeletal (muscles, bones, and joints) injuries of all Canadians, whether on the field or in the clinic.

Athletic therapists adhere to the Sports Medicine Model of care. They treat a wide range of patients, from kids with concussions to seniors recovering from hip replacement surgery, using various manual therapies, modalities, exercise prescription and even bracing and taping. The treatment varies but the objective doesn’t: an Athletic Therapist’s goal is to help clients return to their usual activities, whether that means playing competitive sports or walking to the mailbox and back.”

More information can be found on their website: https://athletictherapy.org/en.

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapists help restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness or disability. They accomplish this through movement and exercise, manual therapy, and patient education. Physiotherapist’s in Canada complete a 4 year undergrad and then proceed into a 2 year masters of Physiotherapy, followed by an intense certification exam. Their formal education focuses on the study of neurology, cardiorespiratory and orthopaedics.

They are typically found working in private clinics, hospitals, retirement residences and child development centres. Physiotherapists in Canada work with clients of all ages and with a wide range of health conditions. Physiotherapists tend to specialize in a certain area of practice, which can include working with patients who have had strokes or other neurological injuries, paediatrics, women’s health, oncology rehab, in intensive care units and other inpatient settings as well as common musculoskeletal injuries.

The definition of Physiotherapy from the Canadian Physiotherapy Association:

“The heart of the physiotherapy profession is understanding how and why movement and function take place. Physiotherapists are highly skilled and autonomous health professionals who provide safe, quality client-centred physiotherapy through a commitment to service availability, accessibility and excellence. The profession is shaped by scientific evidence and the education and competencies of the physiotherapists delivering the services. Physiotherapy is grounded in the belief that, to be effective, its services must respond to the changing needs of populations and our health system.”

More information can be found at their website: https://physiotherapy.ca/description-physiotherapy. Here you can find a document on the detailed description of Physiotherapy.

Summary

With a few small differences in the two professions, both are a great resource for injury prevention, treatment and education. The largest difference is the scope of practice of a physiotherapist includes cardiovascular and neurological training along with the ability to pierce the skin through extra training in IMS (intermuscular stimulation) and acupuncture, which is not included in the scope of practice of an Athletic Therapist. However, both are experts in helping you recover from your injuries and getting you back to doing what you love!